Noirscape experiments with a cross reality approach to narrative. Participants search for and find fictional objects in their own physical home through the AR (augmented reality) feature. One of these objects is a door and it’s keyhole a doorway between an augmented view of one world and the entirely fictional world of another. Furthermore, Noirscape binds the narrative with physical spaces in the nearby town. In my case and for the purpose of the pilot version of Noirscape, this is the French town of Bourg-en-Bresse.

I previously carried out fieldwork collecting 360 panoramic photographic content in and around the town; at over twenty locations selected not neccesarily for their prominence, but also for their intrigue; whether that be a curious street name, a bygone brewery turned warehouse or the site of a house where a celebrated artist and philosopher one lived. The noirscape experience will take participants into their town where segments of narrative are reveals through what I call flashbacks – these are a staple component of film noir; where the protagonist, who is usually since deceased or condemmed to a life of prison, recounts events from the past which played an important role in their current whereabouts [or absence of].

Opening Sequence to Sunset Boulevard, Paramount, 1950

My challenge is to take my 360 content from the town and combine it with fictional Noir narrative to give an augmented or combined immersive experience whereby the content is triggered only by visiting the place in the physical world and at which point, a flashback from a fictional past occurs. To achieve this I decided to work with digital 3d character creation and animation. I had previously arranged to work with a friend who is also an actor; but, it’s complicate right now with the pandemic, to meet up and spending enough quality time to get something filmed; I was planning to use my green screens and then take the content into the 360 editor using Adobe After Effects and Premier Pro. One thing lead to another and I opted for digital characters. I initially hoped I’d be able to use Adobe software but they have discontinued their Fuse product which was a character designer app that could be used with Mixamo, their recently acquired character animation service. I decided to use Reallusion’s Character Creator instead due to the vast amount of resources available. I used Headshot, their AI face generator to base character on my own face (although I’ve reworked it somewhat since!) and I imported custom objects like a Fedora hat and set up the character in a black coat.

A base character in Reallusion Character Creator software with an AI interpretation of my face projected onto it.
My clothed and hatted character in a T pose
Closer shot

Experimenting with different predefined pose templates

Next I took the character into iClone, Reallusion’s 3D animation suite. The challenge with iClone was to be able to bring in my 360 photo and create my own scene within the panorama. However, I ran into problems with this at first. While export to 360 panorama format is suported in iClone, I couldn’t achieve this using photography without experiencing problems with the way the image was being wrapper; due to distortion at the poles of the sphere if the Skybox object. The Skybox object in iClone and more generally in 3D design, is the imagery used to define the farthest most visible details; this would normally be the sky, hence the name; but may also be a distant mountain range. Usually this would only be thought of as a backdrop, with far more focus on the foreground and midground detail. In my case the Skybox would be represented by a complete 360 photo, in which I would place 3D assets like a person, a vehicle, etc.

Example of 0 degrees (ground) when 360 is wrapped within Photoshop;

Ground shot taken in iClone with the same 360 photo set as the Skybox image

I discussed the issue in the Reallusion support forum; and one solution put forward was to create my own 3d sphere object and set my 360 image as the texture. This did produce a slightly better outcome but not satisfactory enough for what I need. The Reallusion is fantastic nontheless; what I am seeking to do is certainly not a typical user-case by any means. One really good feature with iClone, and one of the key reasons for settings a photo as the Skybox, is for calculating light within a scene. The iClone software will identify from the image, in my case the 360 photo, which direction light is coming from and therefore where to cast light and shade within the 3D assets added to the scene. So, although I chose not to use iClone with the 360 photo visible, I still used it for the lighting work.

Scene from within iClone with my 3D character and other assets placed within my photo.

Within iClone I applied some subtle animation to my character; his tie blows in the wind and he blinks and moves a little while he waits for his rendez-vous. I applied rain effects with splashes and flickering light effects. In order to export my animation without the Skybox image so that I could bring it into Adobe After Effects I would need to export as an image sequence so ensure a transparent background. The sequence is 30 seconds long and 30 frames per second; so the software rendered 900 images in total which I then imported into After Effects.

Within After Effects the first challenge was to align the two-dimensional representation of my sequence within a 360 environment. If I place it as-is then it will be foreably bent into a banana shape as it is interprated through a 360 viewer. So, to avoid this, it’s important to alter the curvature of the 2d assets to align with the 360 image in equirectangular-panoramic format.

The 2D animation curvature is altered to match that of the 360 scene so that when wrapped into a sphere it looks correct.
My Animation positioned within the 360 photo with field of view warping to match 360 sphere position.
Adobe After Effects Settings Using the VR Plane to Sphere effect to warp the field of view.

I’m generally pleases with the outcome and although it took quite a bit of time to get what I wanted, I now have a documented workflow for the process; I have a character ready to deplot to new scenarios and the knowhow to create others much more quickly. A small issue I have with the end result is that the animation is too subtle to really see properly on a mobile device; but this is easily tweaked. For now, I’m going to settle with what I have for the purpose of integrating with the app. The next step is to create a looping image based version of the scene in webp format as I have shown in a previous post. I will then play the audio channel, with the voice narration and sound effects via the app/device rather than the media file itself. This will keep the size of the media file down and allow me to serve the localised element (the view using footage from a specific town) and the global content – the spoken narrative.

Mobile phone view of interactive scene
Interactive YoutTube Version

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